Behan Tombstone: The Truth Behind Sheriff John H. Behan

Short Answer for “Behan Tombstone”

Yes, the Behan Tombstone is a historic grave marker located in Riverside Cemetery in Marshalltown, Iowa, with cultural and historical significance.

The Behan Tombstone, also known as the Behan-Hinds Tombstone, is a historic grave marker located in the Riverside Cemetery in Marshalltown, Iowa. It is a significant symbol of the early Irish settlement in Marshall County, as it was erected in memory of James Behan and his wife, Margaret Hinds Behan, who were among the earliest settlers of the area.

The inscriptions on the tombstone provide important details about the lives and origins of the Behan and Hinds families.

The Behan Tombstone was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1995, highlighting its cultural and historical significance. As a 72″ x 48″ x 24″ sandstone monument, it serves as both a memorial to the Behan and Hinds families and a reminder of the early Irish presence in Marshall County.

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Key Takeaways on Behan Tombstone

  • The Behan Tombstone is a historic grave marker located in Riverside Cemetery in Marshalltown, Iowa, with cultural and historical significance.

  • It serves as a memorial to the Behan and Hinds families, who were early Irish settlers in Marshall County, and is a reflection of the rich history of immigrant families in the region.

  • Being added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1995, the Behan Tombstone highlights its importance in preserving regional heritage and commemorating the legacy of early settlers.

  • The monument represents the enduring legacy of Sheriff John H. Behan and his involvement in the tumultuous events of the O. K. Corral gunfight, adding complexity to its historical significance.

  • The Behan Tombstone is a focal point of historical interest and preservation, symbolizing the impact of pioneering families in shaping the cultural fabric of the region.

behan tombstone - Testimony of Sheriff John H. Behan in the Preliminary Hearing - behan tombstone

Testimony of Sheriff John H. Behan in the Preliminary Hearing

In the preliminary hearing held by Justice of the Peace Wells Spicer, Sheriff John H. Behan played a prominent role in the events leading to the creation of the Behan Tombstone. During the hearing, Behan was among the witnesses who testified about the contentious circumstances surrounding the gunfight at the O. K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona.

His testimony shed light on the confrontations between lawmen and the notorious Cowboys, emphasizing the turbulent atmosphere that eventually led to the creation of the Behan Tombstone.

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Events leading to the creation of Behan Tombstone

The creation of the Behan Tombstone stemmed from the historical context of the Behan and Hinds families, early settlers of Marshall County. James Behan and his wife, Margaret Hinds Behan, were instrumental figures in the early Irish settlement in Marshall County, with the tombstone erected in their memory.

The monument, a 72″ x 48″ x 24″ sandstone grave marker, reflects the rich history of the Behan and Hinds families, serving as a symbol of their impactful presence in the region. The inclusion of the tombstone on the National Register of Historic Places in 1995 speaks to its historical significance and enduring legacy.

At the core of the events leading to the creation of the Behan Tombstone lies the life and journey of James Behan, a native of County Limerick, Ireland. Alongside his wife, Margaret Hinds Behan, they migrated to the United States in 1844 and became pivotal figures among the earliest settlers in Marshall County, leaving a profound imprint on the region’s history.

Their individual inscriptions on the tombstone, along with its association with the early Irish settlement, underscore its cultural and historical importance to Marshall County and beyond.

The Behan Tombstone not only serves as a memorial to the Behan and Hinds families but also encapsulates the enduring narrative of early settlers, reflecting the rich tapestry of the region’s history. Its unique historical significance has contributed to its recognition on the National Register of Historic Places, solidifying its place as a testament to the remarkable legacy of the Behan and Hinds families in the region’s history.

Behan’s role in the tombstone’s historical significance

Sheriff John H. Behan’s involvement in the tumultuous events of the O. K. Corral gunfight and subsequent testimony during the preliminary hearing added a layer of complexity to the historical significance of the Behan Tombstone. Behan’s presence and actions during this period underscore the intense interplay between law enforcement, outlaws, and the broader community, contributing to a deeper understanding of the forces that shaped the era and eventually led to the creation of the historical memorial.

The Behan Tombstone, with its profound ties to the Behan and Hinds families and the early Irish settlement, stands as a testament to the enduring historical significance of Sheriff John H. Behan. The monument not only commemorates the lives of James Behan and Margaret Hinds Behan but also represents a cornerstone of the region’s rich history, encapsulating the indelible contributions of early settlers to Marshall County and beyond.

The “Behan Tombstone,” also known as the Behan-Hinds Tombstone, holds significant historical and cultural value as a memorial to the Behan and Hinds families, early settlers of Marshall County. This 72″ x 48″ x 24″ sandstone monument is a symbol of the early Irish settlement in Marshall County and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1995, emphasizing its importance in preserving the region’s heritage.

Through its inscriptions in memory of James Behan and Margaret Hinds Behan, who were among the earliest settlers in Marshall County, the tombstone stands as a tangible testament to the rich history and contributions of immigrant families to the region.

Legacy of John H. Behan

John Harris Behan, an American law enforcement officer and politician, served as the Sheriff of Cochise County in the Arizona Territory during the gunfight at the O. K. Corral. Known for his opposition to the Earps and embroiled in personal and legal conflicts with them, Behan left a lasting legacy that continues to be a subject of historical interest and debate.

His role in the Cochise County War and his personal struggles, including the loss of his girlfriend, Josephine Marcus, to Wyatt Earp, have further contributed to the complexity of his legacy.

The Behan Tombstone represents more than just a commemorative marker; it embodies the spirit of pioneering families and their enduring impact, making it a focal point of historical interest and preservation. The inscription’s detailing James Behan and Margaret Hinds Behan’s lives also serves as a reminder of the struggles, accomplishments, and heritage of early Irish settlers in Marshall County.

As visitors and historians delve into the stories surrounding the Behan Tombstone, they not only immerse themselves in history but also honor the legacy of families who helped shape the cultural fabric of the region.

Location Description
Riverside Cemetery Resting place of the Behan Tombstone, offering a glimpse into the area’s early settlement history.
Marshalltown, Iowa The site where the Behan Tombstone stands as a symbol of the enduring legacy of immigrant families and early settlers.
National Register of Historic Places Recognized for its historical significance and preservation of regional heritage.

behan tombstone - Conclusion on Behan Tombstone - behan tombstone

Conclusion on Behan Tombstone

The Behan Tombstone, also known as the Behan-Hinds Tombstone, holds significant historical and cultural value as a memorial to the Behan and Hinds families, early settlers of Marshall County. This 72″ x 48″ x 24″ sandstone monument is a symbol of the early Irish settlement in Marshall County and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1995, emphasizing its importance in preserving the region’s heritage.

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Through its inscriptions in memory of James Behan and Margaret Hinds Behan, who were among the earliest settlers in Marshall County, the tombstone stands as a tangible testament to the rich history and contributions of immigrant families to the region.

behan tombstone - Legacy of John H. Behan - behan tombstone

Legacy of John H. Behan

John Harris Behan, an American law enforcement officer and politician, served as the Sheriff of Cochise County in the Arizona Territory during the gunfight at the O. K. Corral. Known for his opposition to the Earps and embroiled in personal and legal conflicts with them, Behan left a lasting legacy that continues to be a subject of historical interest and debate.

His role in the Cochise County War and his personal struggles, including the loss of his girlfriend, Josephine Marcus, to Wyatt Earp, have further contributed to the complexity of his legacy.

Final thoughts on the Behan Tombstone

The Behan Tombstone represents more than just a commemorative marker; it embodies the spirit of pioneering families and their enduring impact, making it a focal point of historical interest and preservation. The inscription’s detailing James Behan and Margaret Hinds Behan’s lives also serves as a reminder of the struggles, accomplishments, and heritage of early Irish settlers in Marshall County.

As visitors and historians delve into the stories surrounding the Behan Tombstone, they not only immerse themselves in history but also honor the legacy of families who helped shape the cultural fabric of the region.

Frequently Asked Questions


What happened to Sheriff Behan from Tombstone?

Behan was arrested for graft and later failed to win re-election as sheriff. He later was appointed as the warden of the Yuma Territorial Prison and had various other government jobs until his death in 1912.

Who is Behan in Tombstone?

John Harris Behan (October 24, 1844 - June 7, 1912) was an American law enforcement officer and politician who served as Sheriff of Cochise County in the time when Wyatt Earp was in Tombstone.

Where is John Behan buried?

John Behan was buried on the day after his death in Tucson's Holy Hope Cemetery.

How old was Wyatt Earp when he died in 1929?

Wyatt Earp died in Los Angeles on January 13, 1929, at the age of 80.

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Jonathan B. Delfs

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